CONSULT January 2019

Bachelor of Science in Radiologic Sciences graduate Aurlivia Deshay Bibbs, right, received the Virginia Stansel Tolbert Award from Dr. Jessica Bailey, dean of the School of Health Related Professions.
Bachelor of Science in Radiologic Sciences graduate Aurlivia Deshay Bibbs, right, received the Virginia Stansel Tolbert Award from Dr. Jessica Bailey, dean of the School of Health Related Professions.
Main Content

UMMC confers 853 degrees in health sciences professions

Published on Friday, May 24, 2019

By: Ruth Cummins, ricummins@umc.edu

The University of Mississippi Medical Center on Friday conferred degrees to 853 students who are beginning their careers in the health sciences, or entering into a new chapter of an existing one in this state and beyond.

The graduates of the schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Graduate Studies in the Health Sciences, Nursing, Health Related Professions and Population Health are entering into a new stage of their professional lives. They were recognized during UMMC’s 63rd Commencement at the Mississippi Coliseum in Jackson.

Of this year’s graduates, 647 attended commencement and received their diplomas.

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Dr. LouAnn Woodward, vice chancellor for health affairs and dean of the School of Medicine, challenged graduates to find solutions to the nation’s struggles with health care.

“There are just four things that I want you to take with you,” Dr. LouAnn Woodward, vice chancellor for health affairs and dean of the School of Medicine, told graduates.

“Number one, this is only the beginning of your learning process. Number two, deal with others and those you serve with a deep respect for their differences.

“Number three, our nation will continue to struggle with ways to care for the sick. You can play a role in finding a solution to this struggle. Number four, you will never practice any health profession well if you don’t have a good time doing it.”

“Those of you who will receive your degrees today and soon begin practicing the healing arts share a common legacy with all who have gone before you, and that is a mark of quality,” said Interim University of Mississippi Chancellor Larry Sparks.

“We’re confident that you’re well prepared for your next steps of training or to assume your responsibility as a health care provider.”

After receiving her Ph.D. in Nursing, Katie Hall, left, is hooded by Dr. Jennifer Robinson, one of her professors.
After receiving her Ph.D. in Nursing, Katie Hall, left, is hooded by Dr. Jennifer Robinson, one of her professors.

Among the new graduates is Katie Hall of Brandon, an assistant professor in the School of Nursing. Today, she became Dr. Katie Hall with her new Ph.D. in Nursing in hand.

“In the course of this program, I’ve added another child to my life,” said Hall, a Brandon resident who began her doctoral studies five years ago. “Raising two kids, working full time, going to school full time … totally worth it.”

Hall, who teaches first-year traditional nursing students, received her bachelor of science in nursing from Mississippi College in 2008 and her master of nursing education from UMMC in December 2011. She decided to pursue her doctorate when she was a clinical floor nurse educator in the pediatric ICU.

“I knew that academia was where I wanted to end up, so it was my next goal to achieve,” she said. “I had really good support from my husband, and my children are young. I wasn’t missing the sporting events or all-nighters that I know are coming later.”

While daughter Makenzie, 2, is oblivious to Hall’s schooling, her 6-year-old Mollie “is so excited that mama is finally done with college,” Hall said. “We are ready for a vacation. We’re going to the beach!”

School of Medicine graduate Dr. Sosa Adah received his hood from his father, Dr. Felix Adah, professor of physical therapy in the School of Health Related Professions.
School of Medicine graduate Dr. Sosa Adah received his hood from his father, Dr. Felix Adah, professor of physical therapy in the School of Health Related Professions.

Commencement is the culmination of a dream for Clinton resident Sosa Adah.  Medical school “‘seemed impossible four years ago, but the impossible is about to turn into the possible,” he said.

Adah, who’s headed to a pediatric residency at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo., was hooded by his dad, Dr. Felix Adah, professor of physical therapy in the School of Health Related Professions. 

Medicine wasn’t the career on Sosa’s mind during his time at Clinton High. He played on the Chicago Fire Juniors, the official youth club affiliate of the professional soccer club Chicago Fire – but then tore a ligament in his senior year. “I chose to pursue academics instead,” Adah said. He received his bachelor of science in biochemistry from the University of Mississippi.

In Kansas City, Adah hopes to work with youth soccer players, just like he’s done for the past three years as a Madison Central High soccer team volunteer. “As I start this new journey, I want to find a local soccer team and help mentor the kids,” he said.

Dr. Alan Lucas, left, and his wife, Dr. Melinda Lucas, hood their daughter, Meredith Lucas, as she receives the Doctor of Dental Medicine. Her parents are alumni of the School of Dentistry.
Dr. Alan Lucas, left, and his wife, Dr. Melinda Lucas, hood their daughter, Meredith Lucas, as she receives the Doctor of Dental Medicine. Her parents are alumni of the School of Dentistry.

The degrees conferred today:

School of Medicine, 148 graduates receiving the Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree.

School of Dentistry, 33 graduates receiving the Doctor of Dental Medicine (D.M.D.) degree and 25 graduates receiving the Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene.

School of Nursing, 363 graduates receiving either the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.), Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.), or Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.)

School of Graduate Studies in the Health Sciences, 99 graduates receiving either the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree or the Master of Science (M.S.) degree.

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Md. Mohiuddin Adnan received his Master of Science in Biostatistics and Data Science from the John D. Bower School of Population Health.

School of Health Related Professions, 183 graduates receiving either the Doctorate in Physical Therapy (D.P.T.) or Doctorate in Health Administration (D.H.A.); Master of Occupational Therapy (M.O.T.); Master of Science (M.S.) in Health Sciences, Health Informatics and Information Management, Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Nuclear Technology; or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in Radiologic Sciences, Medical Laboratory Science, Health Sciences, or Health Informatics and Information Management.

School of Population Health, three graduates, Master of Biostatistics and Data Science.

Among those receiving accolades was Dr. Mike Ryan, professor of physiology and biophysics and associate dean of the School of Graduate Studies in the Health Sciences. He is winner of the 2018 Regions TEACH Prize, given to the person who most represents the highest qualities of the Medical Center's academic faculty.

The six students who received top honors were:

Trinity Brown, right, a Bachelor of Science in Nursing graduate, receives the Christine L. Oglevee Memorial Award from Dr. Mary Stewart, interim dean of the School of Nursing.
Trinity Brown, right, a Bachelor of Science in Nursing graduate, receives the Christine L. Oglevee Memorial Award from Dr. Mary Stewart, interim dean of the School of Nursing.

Ashli Fitzpatrick, Waller S. Leathers Award for the medical student with the highest academic average for four years;

Mary Reynolds, Wallace V. Mann Jr. Award for the dental student with the highest academic average for four years;

Trinity Brown, Christine L. Oglevee Memorial Award for the outstanding School of Nursing baccalaureate graduate;

Ben Shannon, Richard N. Graves Award for the registered nurse deemed most outstanding by the faculty in clinical and overall performance;

Aurlivia Bibbs, Dr. Virginia Stansel Tolbert award for the student with the highest academic average in the School of Health Related Professions.

Edgar Meyer, Robert A. Mahaffey Jr. Memorial Award to recognize exceptional research potential of young investigators.

The University of Mississippi Medical Center presented diplomas to 853 graduates during May 24 ceremonies at the Mississippi Coliseum in Jackson.
The University of Mississippi Medical Center presented diplomas to 853 graduates during May 24 ceremonies at the Mississippi Coliseum in Jackson.